Year 9 — Classics

Term 1: Roman Kings and the Republic

In term 1 the students will study the early legends and history of Rome. The students are first taught the mythological connection to the ancient city of Troy and the foundation of the city by Romulus and Remus. The students will then learn about how Rome existed as an early monarchy and the events that led to the dissolution of the monarchical system. In the next sub-unit, the students will learn about the founding and the nature of the Roman Republic. This includes looking at the social, political and class components of the Republic. Moreover, the students will explore various case studies that look into certain events and conflicts that the Roman Republic was engaged in, such as the titanic war between the Republic and its greatest enemy, Carthage. As with all classical subjects, there is a comprehensive study of various primary sources. The students will be taught how to analyse the utility of the sources, focusing on detecting bias and comparing them to the wider historical context.

The students are assessed by answering questions in relation to an ancient source and GCSE style 8 mark essay question on a specific case study.

Republic

A government without a monarch.

Senate

A government body of the Roman Republic made up of aristocrats.

Consul

The most senior magistrate in the Roman Republic.

Carthage

A major rival to the Roman Republic based in North Africa.

Aeneas

A founder of the Roman people from Troy.

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural

Develop the individual:

The students develop their skills in source analysis and extended writing evaluation.

Create a supportive community:

The students develop their understanding of the political systems of ancient Rome and the impact they had on the development of western governments.

Term 2: The Fall of the Roman Republic

In term 2, the students learn about the events that led to the fall of the Roman Republic. The students are taught about the major players involved, their reasons for entering into civil war and the consequences of Julius Caesar gaining dictatorial power in the Roman Republic. The students then go on to learn about the events of the second civil war, including key events such as the affair of Antony and Cleopatra and the emergence of Octavian as the first Roman Emperor, Augustus Caesar. Similar to the first term, the students are taught through the use of primary sources and the students are taught how to thoroughly evaluate the usefullness of those sources for a historical judgement.

The students are assessed on some questions in relation to a source and a GCSE style 15 mark essay.

Julius Caesar

the major character in the fall of the Roman Republic.

Triumvirate

When power is shared by three people.

Dictator

When one man holds all the power.

Augustus

The first Roman Emperor.

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural

Develop the individual:

The students develop their evalution of interpretations and inference of ancient Roman sources.

Create a supportive community:

The students develop their understanding of Roman dictatorships and the precedents set in the ancient world that impact today's and recent history's societies.

Term 3: Ancient Greece

In term 3, our students are taught about the Classical history of Athens and Sparta. This includes a study of the political systems of Athens and Sparta as well as exploring various social components of their culture, including the infamous Spartan education system. The students will also learn about the Persian Empire and the wars fought between Persia and Greece. This is then followed the final major internal conflict of Classical Greece, the Peloponnesian War.

Students' classwork and homework will be assessed by teachers and students given feedback on their work.

Archon

An Athenian magistrate.

Helot

Spartan slave.

Pericles

An Athenian politician.

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural

Develop the individual:

The students develop their source analysis skills with a focus on the usefulness of sources to modern historians.

Create a supportive community:

The students develop their understanding of Athenian democracy and the impact it had on today's world.

Term 4: Alexander the Great

In term 4, the students will engage in a comprehensive study of Alexander the Great. The course begins with some lessons on the state of Macedonia, Philip II, and the early life of Alexander the Great. The students then go on to learn about the conquests of Alexander in Egypt, Persia, and western India. The students will explore a wide breath of ancient sources and the large quantity of the content, taught in class, derives from these sources. The students will write an essay evaluating the successes and failures of Alexander and make a judgement on whether Alexander should be considered "Great".

The students answer some short questions on historical sources and complete a 15 mark GCSE essay question on Alexander the Great.

Philip II

King of Macedonia and father of Alexander.

Macedonia

State in Northern Greece.

Persian Empire

A massive Asian empire centred in Iran.

Phalanx

A Greek spear wall.

Hellenic Kingdoms

Kingdoms set up after the death of Alexander the Great.

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural

Develop the individual:

The students develop their 'cause and consequence' second-order concept essay skills with an emphasis on the evaluation of factors.

Create a supportive community:

The students develop their understanding of the impact of contrasting cultures coming together in the ancient world and its relevance today.

Term 5: Odysseus

In term 5, the students study a literature module rather than a historical course, like the previous 4 terms. In this module, the students read extracts from five books (chapters) from Homer's Odyssey The students learn about the narrative of the story as well as literery techniques that are used to analyse the writing style of the author. The students will practice GCSE style essay questions as well as source activities.

Source questions on the Odyssey and a 15 mark GCSE style question.

vexo

annoy

cognito

think

forte

by chance

carus

dear

periculum

danger

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural

Develop the individual:

The students develop their language analysis skills in relation to ancient Greek literature.

Create a supportive community:

The students develop their understanding of ancient Greek literature and the impact this had on literature in the western world.

Term 6: Greek and Roman gods

GCSE COURSE BEGINS. This topic examines the pantheon of gods, focusing on the twelve Olympian gods, as well as Dionysus/Bacchus and Hades/Pluto. We will discover what unique skills each of them had, and how the Greeks and Romans typically represented them in their art and literature.

GCSE exam question on a source and 8 mark questions.

vulnus

wound

domus

home

crudelis

cruel

decem

ten

unus

one

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural

Develop the individual:

The students develop their extended writing and evaluation skills with the use of ancient sources.

Create a supportive community:

The students develop their understanding of ancient religious culture similarities and differences to modern religions.